Squatted trucks get banned in North Carolina

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Petitions to ban squatted trucks are gaining ground on Change.org. One such petition calling for a ban on the trucks in North Carolina racked up over 71,000 signatures. Truck owners may have to opt for hydraulic kits to level out their rides when driving in North Carolina following a ban there enacted last week by Gov. Roy Cooper.
Petitions to ban squatted trucks are gaining ground on Change.org. One such petition calling for a ban on the trucks in North Carolina racked up over 71,000 signatures. Truck owners may have to opt for hydraulic kits to level out their rides when driving in North Carolina following a ban there enacted last week by Gov. Roy Cooper.
Change.org

While we haven’t spotted many squatted work trucks, we’re going to see any fewer at least in North Carolina.

Last week, Gov. Roy Cooper (D) signed a bill banning trucks that are raised in the front and lowered in the rear.

Critics say such modifications to the trucks make them less safe since the front-lift reduces driver visibility, projects the headlights at a high angle and impacts truck handling.

According to N.C. House Bill 692, drivers will be cited if “the suspension, frame, or chassis, the height of the front fender is 4 or more inches greater than the height of the rear fender. For the purposes of this subsection, the height of the fender shall be a vertical measurement from and perpendicular to the ground, through the centerline of the wheel, and to the bottom of the fender."

Drivers have until Dec. 1 to level up, move out of the state or risk getting cited. A third ticket will result in license revocation for at least one year.